Group B Strep infection

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If you are pregnant, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a group B strep screening between weeks 35 and 37 of pregnancy. Your doctor will take a swab sample from your vagina and rectum and send it to a lab for testing. A positive test indicates that you carry group B strep. It doesn't mean that you're ill or that your baby will be affected. It simply means the potential for newborn infection exists, and you can take steps to protect your baby. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacterial infection that can be found in a pregnant woman's vagina or rectum. This bacteria is normally found in the vagina and-or rectum of about 25% of all healthy, adult women. Those women who test positive for GBS are said to be colonized. A mother can pass GBS to her baby during delivery. GBS is responsible for affecting about 1 in every 2,000 babies in the United States. Not every baby who is born to a mother who tests positive for GBS will become ill. Although GBS is rare in pregnant women, the outcome can be severe, and therefore doctors include testing as a routine part of prenatal care.

Symptoms:

Laboratory Test Procedures:

no symptoms
urinary tract infection

Group B Strep (Vaginal/Rectal)
Group B Strep Penicillin Allergic
WBC
Fibrinogen
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Copyright © 2017 SmrtX Last updated: Friday, January 6th, 2017