Gestational Diabetes

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Gestational diabetes is a form of hyperglycemia seen in some pregnant women, usually late in their pregnancy. The cause is unknown, but it is thought that some hormones from the placenta increase insulin resistance in the mother, causing elevated blood glucose levels. Most women are screened for gestational diabetes between their 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. If gestational diabetes is found and not addressed, the baby is likely to be larger than normal, be born with low glucose levels, and be born prematurely. The hyperglycemia associated with gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby's birth, but both the women diagnosed with gestational diabetes and their babies are at an increased risk of eventually developing type 2 diabetes. A woman who has gestational diabetes with one pregnancy will frequently experience it with subsequent pregnancies.

Symptoms:

Laboratory Test Procedures:

increased frequency of urination at night
increased urine output
excessive thirst
weight loss
fatigue
blurred vision
drastic appetite shifts
sores
increased hunger
nausea
vomiting
increased number and severity of infections

Glucose 1hr (50g) (O'Sullivan)
Glucose Tolerance 2hr (75g)
Glucose Tolerance 3hr (75g)
Glucose Tolerance 3hr Preg (100g)
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All information on this page is intended for your general knowledge only and does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See Additional Information

Copyright © 2017 SmrtX Last updated: Friday, January 6th, 2017